>
 

Comments On - How to start an Urban Beehive


Even this gentleman is wearing a veil, btw. And don't buy used equipment, it can be contaminated with American Foul Brood spores, which remain viable for decades.
WesternWilson, International
Posted: 2/6/2014 9:14:51 AM
Good information
Annie, Houston, TX
Posted: 8/28/2012 8:19:16 AM
Good advice
Galadriel, Lothlorien, ME
Posted: 8/2/2012 11:46:25 PM
My brother just let me know he will have nucs at the end of the month. I plan on building a top bar hive. It seems to me that the top bar method has a smaller colony and is good for beginners and is a much more natural method, possibly reducing problems associated with stress. We'll see.
Carina, Indianapolis, IN
Posted: 5/7/2012 3:25:49 PM
I have discovered a huge interest in people wanting to know about bees and beekeeping. There are a group of people that want to start a bee club here in Las Vegas. If anyone is interested in joining please contact me at robinpagen76@aol.com. THX and Bee Friendly!
Robin, Las Vegas, NV
Posted: 1/20/2012 1:37:24 PM
Great article. I look forward to the day I get mine started.
Chuck, Reno, NV
Posted: 12/6/2011 4:03:16 AM
I wish I didn't have an unreasonable fear of getting stung; I would love to have the honey!
Chris, Kannapolis, NC
Posted: 8/16/2011 12:30:35 PM
You don't have to mail order bees to start a new colony in your hive. In fact, it's better to acquire a local swarm that has been captured or purchase an existing colony. Local bees are more likely to thrive in your area and have probably over-wintered (a good indication that it's a healthy queen and colony). Most local beekeeping groups can help you out with acquiring a healthy local colony. You'll improve the chances that your hive will make it through the winter this way.
brad, lafayette, CA
Posted: 6/28/2011 2:21:37 PM
Even if there is not a specific ordinance, you probably want to talk to your health department. There's no law against beekeeping in my city but the health department had bad experiences with the couple hives set up over the years and promised to shut me down if I tried.
Lynn, West Allis, WI
Posted: 11/11/2010 5:33:17 AM
Great article, very helpful. I am just starting out in this aspect. A friend who is an established and experienced beekeeper has gotten me going in this new area. I'm very excited.
Bruce, Las Vegas, NV
Posted: 9/14/2010 1:41:59 PM
Gentle bees is a good idea.
;, i, AS
Posted: 9/6/2010 9:26:35 PM
I love keeping bees. Except when they get stuck in my clothing.
Galadriel, Lothlorien, ME
Posted: 9/2/2010 11:57:27 PM
Bees that are purchased in packages are not swarms. They are bees that are shaken out of existing hives. Many times, the shaken bees come from multiple colonies.

When you place these bees, with the queens that are usually shipped with them into a hive, you have a colony, not a swarm.

Terminology is important because new beekeepers can become easily confused.

Also, if you plan on buying used bee hive equipment, be prepared to scorch the insides with a propane torch to prevent against the possibility of spreading diseases like American Foulbrood or European Foulbrood.

For many people, the cost and heavy labor of manipulating hive bodies loaded with honey is more than they expected and can bur them out on their new, supposed to be fun, hobby.

For this reason, many beekeepers are taking up horizontal top bar hives which requires less physical activity and allows bees to be interacted with and studied more relaxed as bees tend to remain docile in these types of hives. Very good hives for beginners, people with disabilities and older folks whose backs aren't what they used to be.
BigBear, Omaha, NE
Posted: 9/2/2010 7:14:15 PM
Top Products
d
Gold Standard

*Content generated by our loyal visitors, which includes comments and club postings, is free of constraints from our editors’ red pens, and therefore not governed by I-5 Publishing, LLC’s Gold Standard Quality Content, but instead allowed to follow the free form expression necessary for quick, inspired and spontaneous communication.