>
 

Comments On - Goat Rumen Illnesses


A want to thank you for having this info up on your site. I had sick goat and your info was spot on. 5 days of hard work and your site saved him
Steve unger WV
Steve, 25411, WV
Posted: 7/21/2014 5:37:27 AM
my 5 month old kid goat is laying down a lot more than usual and gets a blank stare on her face or presses her head against something and just stays there um I don't know if it's normal or not this is my first successful bottle baby goat
lucas, jones, OK
Posted: 7/13/2014 9:09:14 AM
Good info.
Sarah, Marathon, ON
Posted: 4/13/2014 4:30:09 PM
I have found that there is a difference between bloat from drinking too much milk and enterotoxemia. With enterotoxemia, the bloat does not cause a tympanic rumen but the goat (kid in this case) is in pain. The C & D Antitoxin will work if given soon.
Yvonne, Henniker, NH
Posted: 10/8/2013 2:51:16 PM
An easy way to help prevent bloat is by offering baking soda free choice... just attach a little bucket near the feed & water and they will nibble a little as they need it.. they will start to self medicate as soon as a week of age. Someone I read used a PVC pipe with a V in it and a cap... the long arm with the cap contained the reserve Baking Soda and as the goats ate from the short arm it would gradually fill up again. We use it for our sheep and just have a bucket attached to the fence and even if it freezes or is very wet it will dry or still be good (you may have to break the surface from crustiness) ... even the cows will use this treatment.
Lorna, Poplarfield, MB
Posted: 6/8/2013 2:11:27 PM
Go to know
Annie, Houston, TX
Posted: 9/3/2012 8:12:10 AM
We were trying to esablish a small herd, and a mysterious illness kept hitting 1 goat at a time, and finally we lost 3 to it. When looking at the symptoms, we thought it was worms, and established a regular regimen. The symptoms of diahrea would subside for a bit, but would come back a little later. But, on the 3 we lost, there was a rapid decline in health. The first victim we took to a vet for answers. Now, there a not a lot of vets who are experts in treating Goats. Even though they do treat them. Their answer again, was worms. One at a time, the 3 that were affected, had to be put down. I finally know what was happening, by reading your information! Our land is in the country, but in a semi residential area. What I found is a neighbor had been feeding the goats, all of them: CORN, HORSE FEED, OATS, and I think ALFALFA. We were treating the wrong disease! We had no idea until the last one had to be put down that they were feeding them. WE were turned into animal control for the rapid decline in the last one to be put down. No, we were NOT cited. The officer after a very brief discussion knew we were doing all we could, and at least were treating the animal. So what the neighbor thought was KINDNESS, was interfering in our efforts to treat a disease that should not have happened in the first place! The folks that called animal control, caused the problem. I am trying to see if I can have them prosecuted. I got rid of all our goats!
Scott in TX, Springtown, TX
Posted: 11/11/2010 12:20:22 AM
Scary but all too true.
Galadriel, Lothlorien, ME
Posted: 6/8/2010 11:05:07 PM
Enterotoxemia-several of my dairy goats have had this problem, there is an anti-toxin that you an give, C&D antitoxin and by using C&D toxoid yearly will help in preventing the problem, check with your local vets for the treatments, if none is avaliablity, or check online with Jeffers and other supply houses
robert, lebanon, OK
Posted: 5/19/2010 2:58:15 PM
Top Products
d
Gold Standard

*Content generated by our loyal visitors, which includes comments and club postings, is free of constraints from our editors’ red pens, and therefore not governed by I-5 Publishing, LLC’s Gold Standard Quality Content, but instead allowed to follow the free form expression necessary for quick, inspired and spontaneous communication.