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Comments On - Growing in a Small-Scale Greenhouse


I am in the process of putting up my green house. I have choosen to make it 20X20. I live in Southern California and our temps can reach up to 115 degrees in the summer months. My question is i am going to put a clear plexy glass on my green house, is is going to be to hot? should I put something else or maybe shade cloth over it. I really like the thought of being able to see through it. Thank You a Green house Newbie
Kathleen, Nuevo, CA
Posted: 4/14/2014 3:51:52 PM
Just set up a small greenhouse :). My only challenge is when can I start growing in it. I'm in Ohio and this winter has been ugly, not sure if it would be safe to start my seeds in it yet. Any suggestions?
Danielle K., Columbus, OH
Posted: 3/7/2014 11:55:36 AM
I have a small greenhouse I got at Harbor Freight..I've upgraded it with greenhouse bubble wrap, a whitewash type solution on the outside, shelving, etc. I love it! But it does get hot in there over the summer here in Sacramento...even with a fan and shade cloth!
Barbara, Sacramento, CA
Posted: 2/28/2014 5:56:28 PM
Great article. We are hoping to add a greenhouse to our backyard soon to increase our garden potential and yield.
Sarah, Marathon, ON
Posted: 2/28/2014 1:30:15 PM
Hi, I am a college student doing a research paper on personal greenhouses. I would like to ask the author of this article, Kelly Wood, questions about having her experience with having a greenhouse. If I could be contacted about this, that would be great. chr12041@byui.edu
Also, if anyone else reading this has a personal greenhouse, I would love to hear about your experiences.
Thanks so much, Jessie Woods
Jessie, Rexburg, ID
Posted: 7/15/2013 9:16:07 AM
Would love to have one but just seem a little too expensive for my budget to acquire, say, an 8' X 12'.
Dante, Hyde Park, MA
Posted: 5/27/2013 8:04:18 AM
Leaving a comment to see if I get points.
Galadriel, Lothlorien, ME
Posted: 2/10/2013 12:03:24 AM
m
m, m, ME
Posted: 2/9/2013 11:59:34 PM
Interesting
Annie, Houston, TX
Posted: 12/18/2012 7:17:05 AM
Too true.
Galadriel, Lothlorien, ME
Posted: 10/20/2012 11:38:50 PM
GENERAL COMMENT>

I don't think there have been many new articles added for a while. Sure would like to see some new articles that we can't find in the magazine. Thank you.
Chuck, Reno, NV
Posted: 1/18/2012 10:22:28 PM
Good info, thanks. I have been looking at these and was thinking of adding it to the wishlist.
Chuck, Reno, NV
Posted: 12/15/2011 2:39:05 AM
I actually live in one of the few places where a permanent greenhouse doesn't make sense. Although I do use cool season protection for my crops, small, portable row covers and raised bed covers actually do for me what a greenhouse does. We just don't have extended periods of cold weather, three or four weeks is all and we haven't had a hard freeze in my micro-climate area in over 25 years.

With that being said, I worked for a company (now defunct) that actually sold and built greenhouses here in the desert. Go figure.
Bruce, Las Vegas, NV
Posted: 9/8/2011 6:00:08 AM
I have one of these but I've never heard of a "cloche." To me it's a greenhouse.
Galadriel, Lothlorien, ME
Posted: 8/8/2011 11:49:28 PM
I want one of these! Might have to show my husband and see if he will make it for me.
Molly, Bay City, MI
Posted: 8/1/2011 7:50:56 AM
For those of us in colder areas such a New England there are a couple more tricks to keep as much heat in as possible in the winter. First, use some sort of insulation on the North wall such as rigid building insulation or stacked straw bales. The straw bales should still work somewhat if kept on the outside as long as there isn't a gap between them and the glazing material (a tarp over them would also help keep water out which would destroy the insulating effect). Second, if maintaining maximum floor space isn't so much of an issue as bench/surface area, get enough large black trash bins (without wheels or holes in the bottom) as will fit along the North wall and fill them with water. You could then just put a sheet of thin plywood over the top for a combined bench/thermal mass unit as well as an emergency backup water supply. Very little can approach water's ability to store heat although some people will partially fill the bins with rocks or concrete blocks. While I haven't heard of anyone having problems, if you really, really want to store as much heat as possible, have a layer of insulating material such as perlite or vermiculite under the bins so that the ground doesn't sap more heat from the bins than is released into the air. Using floating row covers to wrap up particularly sensitive plants during the coldest nights can also help a lot.

I'm currently looking forward to shortly getting my first full sized greenhouse all to myself just in time for fall-no more storing plants in the too warm and too dry basement all winter long! Two lemon trees, two figs, a large bay, a lemon verbena, and about a dozen rosemary bushes that can only just barely survive a winter outside in a sheltered spot will much prefer wintering in a greenhouse with generous heat storage...and my husband will definitely like that I won't have to bring the four fruit trees into the house to block all the good windows. I'm planning for as large as the buildings codes will allow without a permit and know that that will never be enough for everything I'd like to do-home bioshelter anyone?
Shawna, New Bedford, MA
Posted: 7/28/2011 9:26:51 PM
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