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Comments On - Companion Planting


In container planting, do the compatibles and non-compatibles still apply or is it when they are planted in the same soils? If so, how far apart should they be if non-compatible? I don't have a lot of space to spread them on a patio.
Joi, Murrells Inlet, SC
Posted: 5/26/2015 3:13:37 PM
Wonderful information in a very easy to understand chart. Thank you so much for this, just what I was looking for before planting my raised vegetable beds!
Laura, Liberty Hill, TX
Posted: 5/18/2015 8:36:21 PM
Hi Jennifer,
The words in orange are hyperlinked to more information.
Regarding your sweet basil question, perhaps a non-insect critter, such as a rabbit, was nibbling on your basil?
Hobby Farms Editor, Lexington, KY
Posted: 2/12/2015 6:36:49 AM
Hi Again,
I forgot to ask, in your Companion Planting Guild some of the vegetables under Companion and Incompatible are in red. What is the significance of this?
Jennifer, Hastings, MI
Posted: 2/11/2015 8:52:59 AM
Hi,
I moved about two years ago and just got my herb garden built and planted last summer. Across the path from the herb garden I had 3 tomato plants. I actually have a few questions for you. 1. I had Catnip buried in a pot next to my Sweet Basil, it ended up almost surrounding the basil. But something ate my Basil down to nothing anyway, though I never saw any bugs. 2. Also in my herb garden was Fernleaf Dill, by the time it was about 2 1/2' high it had 5 Tomato Hornworm Caterpillars on it. But yet there was not one on my tomatoes which I neglected to companion plant like I usually do. I did not think that the Hornworms would go for Dill. What on earth would eat the Sweet Basil? I have never had this happen before. It was quite upsetting as there went my Pesto! Thanks for the help.
Jennifer Hamann, Hastings, MI
Posted: 2/11/2015 7:45:09 AM
And let's face it: A garden that is made up of many differenty types, textures, colors and heights of plants is much more interesting than any old monocrop field. Don't forget to mix in the flowers, the herbs (careful, they can take over!) and the vining crops (they can spread far and wide, too!). You should have a good roatation plan that includes the information in these charts.

I use a card-type system when I'm planning the next series of beds. Seasons, harvest times, light and heat needs, moisture needs and compatibility planting are all on the cards. I lay them out and move them around until I achieve the right blend for that planting. But knowing who the neighbors are is a key factor.
Bruce, Las Vegas, NV
Posted: 9/12/2013 10:26:16 AM
And let's face it: A garden that is made up of many differenty types, textures, colors and heights of plants is much more interesting than any old monocrop field. Don't forget to mix in the flowers, the herbs (careful, they can take over!) and the vining crops (they can spread far and wide, too!). You should have a good roatation plan that includes the information in these charts.

I use a card-type system when I'm planning the next series of beds. Seasons, harvest times, light and heat needs, moisture needs and compatibility planting are all on the cards. I lay them out and move them around until I achieve the right blend for that planting. But knowing who the neighbors are is a key factor.
Bruce, Las Vegas, NV
Posted: 9/12/2013 10:19:04 AM
Fantastic! I've been wanting a companion planting list for a long time. Thank you, Kristina.
Dante, Hyde Park, MA
Posted: 6/13/2013 7:01:20 PM
Interesting! There is a lot of information here to work with .
Lorna, International
Posted: 5/28/2013 5:48:27 PM
This is great! I may have more room than I thought in my beds this year.
Danielle, Port Angeles, WA
Posted: 4/4/2013 11:28:20 AM
Interesting
Annie, Houston, TX
Posted: 11/3/2012 7:33:22 AM
I have just started researching companion planting as a way to stay in my budget. I saw the prices of pesticides and fertilizers. I am glad there is places like "The Urban Farm" where a person can go and learn how to do things "the old way" to stay within their budget and get healthier too!
Jenna, Hugo, OK
Posted: 10/2/2012 11:20:51 AM
This is great. I've always been pro this method. It would be nice if the chart also listed the reason why a plant is compatible or not.
Galadriel, Lothlorien, ME
Posted: 8/23/2012 11:27:29 PM
I've bought my seeds for this year, and I'm planning out my 3 raised beds according to what will go well with what. Definitely marigolds and nasturtiums will be included. In addition to keeping pests at bay, they make the garden that much more beautiful to look at. Last year, I didn't research ahead of time and, now that I read about companion planting, I realize that it was all my fault that the beans didn't thrive.
Karen, Mississauga, ON
Posted: 2/20/2012 8:15:34 AM
Great article for those who are just getting started in companion planting, as well as being a good read for experienced companion gardeners.
I use companion planting with great success in all of my gardens. It works! :0)
Donna, Honea Path, SC
Posted: 2/19/2012 12:31:22 PM

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