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Spilling the Beans

At Farm and Main from Fall 2010 Urban Farm

By Lisa Munniksma, Urban Farm Editor

Urban Farm editor Lisa Munniksma

Photo by Stephanie Staton

One of my greatest skills is my ability to keep a secret. Tell me just about anything, and I can be trusted with silence. So, for the past few months, I’ve been toting around this large secret. Finally, I’m allowed to share it with you, and I’m psyched. 
 
You know how you’ve been hounding us since last year to give you Urban Farm more frequently and to offer subscriptions so you don’t have to run around town to find it? Well, you’ve got it. Our next issue, scheduled to hit newsstands at the end of November, will be the January/February 2011 issue, and from then on, you’ll be able to find us in your mailbox every other month.
 
Because we have only the most basic of details, we don’t have subscription info yet. If you want it, “like” us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and sign up for the biweekly UrbanFarmOnline eNewsletter—you can find those links at UrbanFarmOnline.com. We’ll give you the deets there as soon as they’re available to us. 
 
November is far away, so this issue is packed with articles to keep you busy until then. You may be wrapping up your garden for the year or making preparations to garden into the colder months, but fall is also a great time to plan next year’s garden. In this issue, we’re giving your garden planning a boost: “On the Up and Up,” “Mix It Up,” “Buried Treasure,” “Out, Damn Critters!” and “Green Thumb” are packed with new ideas and planning tools. Plus, if you’re a micro-greens kind of person (like me), you’ll love “Tabletop Farming.” Cooler weather is not cramping my growing style this year—I’m moving it inside to grow micro-greens all year long. 

Outside the garden gate, this issue has plenty more sustainability ideas. Cohousing, home-brewing and milk-delivery services piqued my interest—the best of cooperation, sustainability and convenience rolled into timeless concepts.   
Speaking of new ideas and planning tools, check out the fun features of UrbanFarmOnline.com. Some of what you’ll find here builds on what you’re reading in the magazine. You’ll find videos and profiles of people who are changing their communities, plus directories for local-food restaurantsfarmers’ markets and community-supported agriculture opportunities.  
 
I’ve already made clear in past “At Farm & Main” columns (you’ll find those here, too!) how important I think community is to the sustainable-living movement. So what would an urban-farming website be without community? Join our community by registering for your own Farmer in the City profile. In the process, search for other urban farmers in your area—people who are raising the same types of produce and backyard livestock, and those in similar urban-farming situations—be that rooftop, backyard or indoor. I’m having a great time learning about the creative urban-farming solutions many of you have put into play!
 
Once you develop your Farmer in the City profile—don’t forget your funky cartoon avatar—find me (Urban Farm Managing Editor), and send me a “friend” request. Once each month, from August through November, I’ll choose one new friend to receive an Urban Farm T-shirt.  

Back to the magazine, let us know what else you’d like to see as you welcome us bimonthly in 2011 by posting on my Farmer in the City profile or emailing us at uf@bowtieinc.com.

Give us your opinion on Spilling the Beans.
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I am so pleased that you are offering your magazine on a subscription basis! It can be difficult to find a location to purchase your magazine, especially since I can never seem to remember when the latest issue is available!
Elizabeth, Rutland, MA
Posted: 8/6/2010 6:09:30 PM

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